Talk:Tivadar Puskás

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This page indicates that the exchange was invented by George Coy. -- by User:Brunnock 12:57, 3 June 2005

Untitled[edit]

That page says "George W. Coy designed and built the world's first switchboard for commercial use". As we all know, there are many "firsts" for everything, it just simply depends on the attribute :-) -- CsTom 16:43, 27 February 2007 (UTC)

potential copyvio[edit]

This article has much in common with the entry for Puskas on budpocketguide.com. --Zippy 03:06, 5 May 2007 (UTC)


Etymology of hallo/hello[edit]

If I'm reading this article correctly, it credits Puskás for creating "hello" and purports that "hello" is of Hungarian etymology. The single reference for this is, of course, in Hungarian. I find no information in English about "hello" having origins in Hungarian language despite the numerous theories on its etymology. The only connection appears to be that 'Edison' is often credited for "hello." Is there then a reason to mention "hello" at all? JFHJr () 22:30, 11 August 2008 (UTC)

I've removed this. I was told this same piece of b******* today on a walking tour of Budapest and went online to see if it were true. See: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=hello&searchmode=none or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hello - the word dates from the 16th century.89.132.124.3 (talk) 12:51, 22 August 2008 (UTC)
This statement, that Puskas invented the word hello, is a Hungarian urban legend. It is definitely false (see above), but that does not change the fact, that it is widely believed, and stated at million places (even at some "respectable" sources). Kope (talk) 19:42, 22 May 2009 (UTC)

Another thing. Shouldn't the title be "Theodore Puskas"? He used this name while in America, I believe. Kope (talk) 19:42, 22 May 2009 (UTC)

Definitely not. What name did he use in France? Is it relevant? Hobartimus (talk) 21:02, 22 May 2009 (UTC)
In the French Wikipedia, yes. Kope (talk) 12:26, 23 May 2009 (UTC)

Is it possible to move "Another thing" discussion to new section, for clarity sake? ~Eric F 184.76.225.106 (talk) 23:10, 1 March 2012 (UTC)

I am not convinced that it is "definitely false" -- when I did "see above", I found: Central telephone exchange operators were known as hello-girls (1889). And T.P. invented the telephone exchange, worked with Edison, and his company installed earliest exchanges. Note also that Hungarian "Hollod?" translates as "Do you hear?" and "Hollom!" translates as "I hear you!" (Google translate). It is alledged that those words were used when testing newly installed lines, and was adapted by operators, etc. -- it is not a totally unfounded theory; yet it remains a theory. ~Eric F 184.76.225.106 (talk) 22:58, 1 March 2012 (UTC)

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Tivadar Puskás/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

dictionary.com and other sources (for example, http://www2.cs.uh.edu/~klong/papers/hello.txt) would disagree with the assertion the the word "hello" would be a derivate of the Hungarian "hallom".Robert.x.h (talk) 02:51, 13 April 2008 (UTC)robert.x.h

Last edited at 02:51, 13 April 2008 (UTC). Substituted at 08:54, 30 April 2016 (UTC)

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